Christ in a Corset at Comic Con

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My boys were enthralled with playing Super Smash Bros. on an old Nintendo 64, so they didn’t notice the black-bearded man in the long, bleach-blond wig, white halter, cape, and white g-string pulled up over his basketball shorts (imagine a dude in this). It was my third Comic Con, so I knew to expect a range of costumes and costume quality, but this was the first where I noticed the cross-dressing cosplay they call “crossplay.”

How to Know

NM
“Knowing is the responsible human struggle to rely on clues to focus on a coherent pattern and submit to its reality.” Esther Lightcap Meek, Longing To Know

We were in the car going somewhere. Our children, Joseph and Jonathan were in the back seat with Bev and me up front. It was nearly Christmas and Joseph was challenging the veracity of our assertions about Santa Claus. It’s you guys, right? Bev and I weren’t ready to abet our seven-year-old’s descent into the murky realm of fact versus fantasy. It’s a yes or a no, he insisted. Stunned by his need for this knowledge, the best I could do was offer a pathetic, Um, well… yes and no.

The Soul’s Tempo in Four Quartets – Part II

St John's Church, Little Gidding, Cambridgeshire, UK, key in the inspiration for the poem Little Gidding by T. S. Eliot. Taken by uploader, February 4, 2006.

St John’s Church, Little Gidding by Keith D. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Read Part I 

“The Dry Salvages,” the third poem in Eliot’s Four Quartets, thinks about time from the wilderness of rivers and oceans, drawing parallels to the cycles of life and to eternity. Rhythmically, this poem feels like water lapping at the shore: “Where is an end of it, the soundless wailing”; “where is there an end to the drifting wreckage”; “where is the end of them, the fishermen sailing”; “there is no end, but addition.”