Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

Reviews

"The Solemn Sea," Jeremiah Webster

Ben Palpant

Somewhere along the way, we have come to believe that a poet’s natural habitat is a coffee shop where—maintained and caffeinated by well-trained baristas—he can brood in private and pace his mind in tiny circles without breaking free to harm the general populace. So when Mr. Webster came to town, it seemed only fitting—however stereotypical—to meet him where he might feel most at home and discuss his latest poem: “The Solemn Sea.”

Read More

Mysteries of the Guild: Reviewing Gene Wolfe’s The Book of the New Sun

Ben Bishop

Wolfe elicits the praise of other novelists because he wields the powers they prize most, both as readers and fellow craftspeople: subtlety, complexity, a virtuosic handling of language, all married to a control that focuses the laser of his genius into the cutting of something greater than the sum of its parts. I suspect writers of speculative fiction love him with a special love because he is both the instantiation and justification of their much-maligned subculture.

Read More

Oh My God, Kevin Morby

Ben Dumbauld

Kevin Morby’s fifth studio album, Oh My God, begins with the sound of an upright piano, past its prime—the kind you find in church backrooms, probably donated and used mostly to accompany Sunday school songs. He plays a flurry of clustered, bluesy notes up and down the keyboard before settling in on the chords, hammered out in steady quarter notes. It’s a good opening for an album, evoking a moment when sporadic musical noodling suddenly, as if through unknown inspiration, coalesces into song. I first listened to Oh My God the day my wife’s great aunt died. After the piano introduction, Morby starts singing a repetitive, “Oh my Lord, come carry me home.” It seemed appropriate. Perhaps more than coincidental.

Read More

Un-Becoming: Poems, Charnell Peters

Julie L. Moore

The “[h]oly body and slave body act the same,” says American scholar Willie James Jennings in his award-winning book, The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race.  In his extensive study, he explores the connection between western colonists’ Christianity and their creation of the social construct of race—and how its long legacy distorts the “vision of creation.” As Ta-Nehisi Coates says in Between the World and Me, “This legacy aspires to the shackling of black bodies. It is hard to face this. But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy—serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscle, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth.”

Read More

Once You Go In, Carly Gelsinger

Julie L. Moore

As one who’s taught in Christian Higher Education for decades, I’ve experienced both healthy and hostile environments. The hostile culture allowed no one to question the authority of the leaders, who bullied employees, purged those viewed as too liberal, and of course, mandated women exercise their voices only in the most submissive and modest manner imaginable.

Read More

The Multitude, Hannah Faith Notess

Megan Pooler

Every once in a while, a writer beautifully expresses the human longing for illumination, causing the reader to sit still for a moment, unable to jump right up and re-enter the everyday world. Hannah Faith Notess offers this experience in her collection of poems, The Multitude.

Read More

The Long Weeping, Jessie Van Eerden

Christie Purifoy

Ours has been called the age of literary memoir. Though I roll my eyes at grandiose words like age—predictably so since ours is also, we are told, an age of irony—I am convinced there is substance to this claim. Memoir, and its umbrella category creative nonfiction, belongs to us in the way the doorstop novel belonged to the Victorians.

Read More

Phases, Mischa Willett: "The Truth is Like Poetry"

Michael Minkoff, Jr.

Mischa Willett begins his first book of poems, Phases, behind a lectern—a dusty word that conjures the professor or the preacher, either of which would be appropriate here. And from this lectern, Willett’s pastor/shepherd calls the whole human race—readers, speaker, writer, all—“sheep.” And not the adorable, acceptable sheep of the safe and precious metaphor we’re sometimes comfortable placing on children. No, we are all the sheep Andre Dubus describes in “Out Like a Lamb”: “stupid, helpless brutes” who “without constant watching . . . would foolishly destroy themselves.”

Read More

The Middle of Things, Meghan Florian

Amy Peterson

Writing in her late twenties, Meghan Florian is not quite writing from middle-age, or from a mid-life crisis. So what does it mean to her to be in “the middle of things?” The second essay in this slender collection, “What about Breakfast at Tiffany’s?” contains the line for which the book is named, and helps illuminate the place from which Florian writes.

Read More

I Will Shout Your Name, John Matthew Fox

Megan Pooler

John Matthew Fox's short story collection, I Will Shout Your Name, looks at missionaries and people of faith from an unexpected perspective – their flaws. Doubt and faith, hesitation and commitment, love and hate all mingle together to create complex characters which initially left me uncertain how to understand the collection as a whole.  As I continued reading, connected themes and repeated questions began to emerge.

Read More

Dangerous Territory, Amy Peterson

Megan Pooler

Amy Peterson reflects on the two years she worked overseas in her memoir Dangerous Territory with care and vulnerability.  As part of her graduate studies, she went to Southeast Asia to teach English and quietly share the gospel.  What followed disassembled everything she though she knew.

Read More

Tasty Other, Katie Manning

Megan Pooler

Katie Manning's poetry collection, Tasty Other, is an honest, clever, and complex reflection on pregnancy and motherhood. As a single woman in my 30s, the majority of my female friends are moms. "Motherhood changes you," they say. I nod, seeing this truth play out in front of me, but never really understanding their meaning.  Manning’s poems invite me to a deeper empathy with all that my mom-friends experience.

Read More